FILMS
The following is a list of past film we’ve enjoyed:
Film Salon Archive - 7 years of classic films
Witness fro the Prosecution
Marlene Dietrich, Charles Laughton, Tyrone Power
Dir. Billy Wilder
1957
116 mins
Crime, Drama

Screened on Apr 7 2012

Marlene Dietrich never quite topped her early success at Paramount in the 1930s and her partnership with director Josef von Sternberg – but she did make many excellent films for several more decades. Among her late period successes was her role as an un-dependable spousal witness who tries to game the British legal system in Billy Wilder’s adaptation of the Agatha Christie story and play. An aging and ill barrister, Charles Laughton agrees to defend Tyrone Power against a murder charge and gets drawn into courtroom intrigue by Dietrich’s conniving witness. It would be Dietrich's last great performance at a time when she was becoming more known for her Las Vegas act.
Destry Rides Again
Marlene Dietrich, James Stewart, Mischa Auer
Dir. George Marshall
1939
94 mins
Western, Comedy

Screened on Mar 3 2012

Marlene Dietrich, known for exuding urbane and worldy sensuality, made a dusty detour with this rare western film. Her costar Jimmy Stewart (whose star had quickly risen with several “everyman” roles in Frank Capra films) plays a law and order deputy intent on cleaning up the corrupt town of Bottleneck – without the assistance of guns! Dietrich’s dancehall queen is part of the problem in the small town, but her admiration soon grows for the man who uses his wits instead of weapons. A delightful remake of an earlier Tom Mix oater, Destry offered a new milieu for Dietrich and was Stewart’s first foray into the western genre. Director George Marshall would re-make the film in 1954 with Audie Murphy as Destry.
The Scarlet Empress
Marlene Dietrich, John Lodge, Sam Jaffe
Dir. Josef von Sternberg
1934
104 mins
Historical, Drama

Screened on Feb 4 2012

Marlene Dietrich’s sixth American film and her fifth pairing with director Josef von Sternberg sneaked into theatres just before the full implementation of the Hays Production Code. Erotically charged, sensual and suggestive throughout, the story of the rise of Catherine the Great is given an expressionistic treatment by von Sternberg. A scarlet story indeed: A young German princess is married off to her Russian cousin (Sam Jaffe’s screen debut) and begins a life-long quest for love, power and the throne of Russia. Notable for the enormous and ornately overwhelming sets that imprison Deitrich, the film remians a fascinating psychological drama studied as much for its production design as for its narrative. With intrigue and innuendo in equal measure, von Sternberg and Dietrich pushed the historical drama to new heights and cemented the actress’ allure in the public eye.
Morocco
Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper, Adolphe Menjou
Dir. Josef von Sternberg
1930
92 mins
Drama, War

Screened on Jan 7 2012

Marlene Dietrich made a big splash on American shores with her first Hollywood film in 1930. The film would be her second of seven pairings with director Josef von Sternberg and it was their previous German film, The Blue Angel, that brought Dietrich international attention. Morocco finds Dietrich a world-weary and disillusioned nightclub singer in a love triangle with Adolph Menjou’s wealthy “older man” and Gary Cooper’s young and virile foreign legionnaire. Romantic conflicts and actual battles push and pull the three apart until Dietrich finally follows her heart. Dietrich’s first American role would be celebrated with an Oscar nomination as well as nods for Best Director, Art Direction and Cinematography. A prime example of the richly detailed and exotic (and erotic) screen environments that von Sternberg would perfect at Paramount.
Shadow of a Doubt
Teresa Wright, Joseph Cotton, Hume Cronyn
Dir. Alfred Hitchcock
1943
108 mins
Thriller, Crime

Screened on Dec 3 2011

Suspicion
Joan Fontaine, Cary Grant, Nigel Bruce
Dir. Alfred Hitchcock
1941
99 mins
Romance, Thriller

Screened on Nov 5 2011

Hitchcock’s fourth film in America, Suspicion is once again set in a British locale with Joan Fontaine starring as a bookish and naïve daughter of wealth. Cary Grant is a fast-talking charmer that sweeps Fontaine into a whirlwind romance and marriage before she really knows anything about him. But it’s not long before Grant’s destitution and past catch up with him and Hitchcock juggles competing narratives: is Grant just a loveable and misunderstood man-boy in need of Fontaine’s love and occasional scolding? Or, is he a cold-blooded con-man intent on murdering his new bride for her life insurance?! The growing chasm between these two perspectives caused Hitch and Grant (and RKO) great consternation…see for yourself how they reconciled the plot. Cary Grant would go on to a number of great Hitchcock films over the next two decades and it all started with Suspicion.
Foreign Correspondent
Joel McCrea, Loraine Day, George Saunders
Dir. Alfred Hitchcock
1940
120 mins
Thriller, Drama

Screened on Oct 1 2011

Rebecca
Laurence Olivier, Joan Fontaine, Judith Anderson
Dir. Alfred Hitchcock
1940
130 mins
Drama, Mystery

Screened on Sep 3 2011

Kiss Me Kate
Kathryn Grayson, HOward Keel, James Whitmore, Keen
Dir. George Sidney
1953
109 mins
Comedy, Musical

Screened on Jul 2 2011

This modern show-biz retelling of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew has once married Howard Keel and Kathryn Grayson playing opposite one another onstage and bickering every chance they get behind the scenes. Add in Ann Miller’s long, long legs and some colorful local gangsters looking to collect on a debt (Keenan Wynn and James Whitmore almost steal the show), and you’re in for lots of dancing, singing and fun with the Cole Porter songbook on full display!
Henry V
Lawrence Olivier, Leslie Banks
Dir. Laurence Olivier
1944
137 mins
Action, Drama

Screened on Jun 4 2011

Olivier would produce, direct and star in this morale-boosting adaptation of Shakespeare’s tale about an underdog nation and king with Olivier picking up an honorary Oscar in 1945 for the film and performance.
Meet John Doe
Gary Cooper, Barbara Stanwyck, Walter Brennan
Dir. Frank Capra
1941
122 mins
Drama, Comedy

Screened on Apr 2 2011

In the 1930’s Frank Capra was the king of Columbia Pictures, turning out successful films focused on the plight of an average “everyman” who overcomes political and corporate obstacles. It was a formula that made millions of dollars at the box-office, brought Capra several Oscars and transformed Columbia into a major studio.

Capra may have moved on to Warner Bros. for his first film of the 1940s, but his style and formulae are still apparent. Barbara Stanwyck is a down-on-her-luck reporter who concocts a letter from a “John Doe” decrying society’s ills and threatening suicide. The public eats it up and demands to meet Mr. Doe, so Stanwyck and her publisher (the ever dependable Edward Albert) run a casting call and pick an unemployed and injured baseball player for the part. A grass-roots national political movement swells around the fresh faced Mr. Doe, Cooper is groomed to run for office and the rest is pure Capra.

It’s almost as if Frank Capra could see the future.
Mr. Smith Goes To Washington
James Stewart, Jean Arthur, Claude Rains
Dir. Frank Capra
1939
129 mins
Comedy, Drama

Screened on Mar 5 2011

By many accounts, 1939 was a high water mark for Hollywood films. For Frank Capra, the year marked a subtle turning point with his latest film, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. Jimmy Stewart, plays another Capra “everyman”, selected to fill a vacancy in the U.S. Senate and ultimately targeted by Washington’s media establishment and corrupt political machinery. Jean Arthur is Stewart’s Chief of Staff and eventual romantic interest who helps pilot him through the capitol’s murky waters.

Originally conceived as a follow-up to Capra’s hugely successful Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, the film raises the stakes and brought real-life scorn on Capra from the country’s ruling elites (and made lots of money at the box office). The film ultimately shows Capra’s view of the world turning slightly more pessimistic with his dramatic sense less balanced by comedy - but his belief in the possibility that one passionate individual can make a big difference hadn’t lessened any.
You Can't Take It With You
James Stewart, Jean Arthur
Dir. Frank Capra
1938
126 mins
Comedy, Romance

Screened on Feb 5 2011

Based on the Pulitzer-prize winning play of the same name, James Stewart and Jean Arthur fall hard for one another but find the task of knitting their two families together - one high establishment and the other eccentric - increasingly difficult. You Can’t Take It With You became the highest grossing film of 1938 (and the Academy’s Best Picture) and Capra received his third Oscar for directing in just four years, further cementing his “golden boy” status at Columbia Pictures.
Mr. Deeds Goes To Town
Gary Cooper, Jean Arthur
Dir. Frank Capra
1936
115 mins
Comedy, Romance

Screened on Jan 8 2011

Gary Cooper plays the Mr. Deeds of the title, a small town bumpkin who inherits 20 million dollars and is beset by every manner of opportunist and
schemer, including the lovely Jean Arthur. After many trials (literal and figurative) it turns out Deeds is a pretty sharp fellow, humbling or beating
those who would do him harm and finding a fitting use for his windfall.

It’s hard to imagine 1930’s Hollywood without Frank Capra. Indeed, his unique optimism and focus on the common man were just what the
Depression-era, pre-War decade needed – so much so, his particular style and outlook didn’t easily translate into later years. But Capra had few peers
in the decade leading into WWII.
The Furies
Barbara Stanwyck, Wyndell Corey, Walter Huston, Gi
Dir. Anthony Mann
1950
109 mins
Western, Drama

Screened on Dec 4 2010

Stanwyck is a cattle queen in love with a Mexican squatter on her father’s ranch – The Furies . In what would mark the beginning of director Anthony Mann’s decade-long refashioning of the western genre (with all the darker themes and tones of his film noir period), The Furies expanded Stanwyck’s repertoire as well. She’s a tough frontier woman increasingly at odds with her unbending father and the hard realities of the New Mexico Territory circa 1870. With Gilbert Roland, Walter Huston, Judith Anderson and Wendell Corey.
Sorry, Wrong Number
Barbara Stanwyck, Burt Lancaster, Wendell Corey
Dir. Anatole Litvak
1952
89 mins
Drama, Crime

Screened on Nov 6 2010

Stanwyck is a woman menaced. After overhearing a nefarious phone conversation, she spirals into a dark world of encircling doom (a hallmark of film noir). With a premise that echoes Hitchcock and with its non-linear, deep-shadowed nightmare world, Sorry, Wrong Number is a claustrophobic treat and gave Stanwyck yet another Best Actress nomination from the Academy. With Burt Lancaster in an early role and Ann Richards, Ed Begley and William Conrad.
Ball of Fire
Barbara Stanwyck, Gary Cooper
Dir. Howard Hawks
1941
111 mins
Comedy, Romance

Screened on Oct 2 2010

Barbara Stanwyck was indeed a “ball of fire” and in this classic comedy, she plays a cabaret singer, on the lam from the law, finding refuge in the household of seven dusty and eccentric professors. She not only lights a fire under one of them – Gary Coopers’ philologist - but invigorates their work to create an encyclopedia of all human knowledge. Amidst all their learning, there’s still a few things only Stanwyck can teach them! German émigré Billy Wilder came up with the idea to subvert and modernize Snow White while on his way to America and he and Charles Bracket fleshed out the script (and the seven dwarfs) to great effect. Stanwyck picked up another of her Oscar nominations for her performance as “Sugarpuss” O’Shea and Billy Wilder would get his last screenplay nomination before deciding to become a director of his own work (and picking up many more nominations and Oscars!).
Stella Dallas
Barbara Stanwyck Jim Boles, Anne Shirley, Alan Hal
Dir. King Vidor
1937
106 mins
Drama, Romance

Screened on Sep 4 2010

In the cinema, mother-love is a key feature of many a melodrama, and among the top mothers, is Stella Dallas. Barbara Stanwyck’s career had been ascendant for some time, but her portrayal of a working class un-sophisticate whose failing attempts to climb the social ladder (leaving her devoted to making sure her daughter’s life turns out better), brought Miss Stanwyck an Oscar nomination for Best Actress (the first of four!). Stella Dallas was a difficult role, conquered by Stanwyck as if it were two parts: one a calculating and public social climber, the other a privately sacrificing mother. She melded the two identities masterfully and kept the audiences – then and now – sympathetic (and weeping). With John Boles, Anne Shirley and Alan Hale.
White Heat
James Cagney, Virginia Mayo
Dir. Raoul Walsh
1949
0 mins
Crime, Action

Screened on Jul 3 2010

By the mid-forties, the actors who played the biggest cinema gangsters of the 1930s, had largely moved on to higher profile dramatic roles, as smaller budget “film noirs” replaced the straight up gangster film. But in 1949, James Cagney was game to play the unforgettable Cody Jarrett – a ruthless, mentally unstable leader of a crime gang. After a train robbery goes bad, Cagney bides his time in the slam, while on the outside his right-hand man moves to take over his turf – over Cagney’s corrupt mother’s body! Before you can say “inferno”, Cagney’s busting out of the joint and leaving a trail of bodies in his wake. With Virginia Mayo and Edmund O’Brien and a great score by Max Steiner, White Heat gives a nod to the great ‘30s gangster pics but is firmly rooted in the more explicit, darker tones that marked crime films of the late forties. “Top of the world, Ma!”
Scarface
Paul Muni, Ann Dvorak
Dir. Howard Hawks
1932
0 mins
Crime, Drama

Screened on Jun 5 2010

Scarface could have been among the first important gangster films of the sound era (and made a lot more money), but it’s realistic and high-body-count depiction of organized crime brought on the meddling of film censors and protracted re-shoots. Loosely based on the notorious Chicago gangster Al Capone (whose nickname was “scarface”), the film charts the quick rise of the unstable street criminal-turned-crime boss Tony Camonte, played by Paul Muni. Shocking for its time, numerous changes to the film were ultimately unsuccessful in pleasing the censors and Hawks, and studio boss Howard Hughes, decided to release the film without a “censors stamp” – to much success and critical acclaim. With Ann Dvorak, George Raft and Boris Karloff.
To Be or Not To Be
Carole lombard, Jack Benny, Robert Stack, Lionel A
Dir. Ernst Lubitsch
1942
99 mins
Comedy, Drama

Screened on Apr 3 2010

By the early 1940’s, with the Second World War raging, the golden age of the Screwball Comedy was coming to a close. A marvelous late entry in the genre, German émigré director Ernst Lubitsch’s war-time theater piece displayed a startling (and sophisticated) use of comedy in a time of war. Carole Lombard and Jack Benny play married and frequently feuding darlings of the Warsaw stage. The pair, along with their theatre and acting troupe, fall on hard times when their new comedy, “Gestapo,” gets shut down in 1939. Their stock production of “Hamlet” helps temporarily appease Poland’s new German occupiers and along the way, Hamlet’s famous line (and the film’s title) acquires multiple meanings as Lombard, Benny and troupe are dragged deeper into intrigue and danger.

All the world’s a stage and before long the little band of thespians must take their acting skills out of the theater and into the streets if they’re to help a downed pilot elude capture (and keep themselves one step ahead of the Nazis). Their situation becomes dire when Hitler visits Warsaw, and there’s nothing left for them to do but impersonate der Fuhrer and his guards, commandeer his motorcade and hijack his plane.

While Hollywood’s wartime studio machinery became devoted to patriotic films; it rarely dealt with the realities of fascism. To Be Or Not To Be is a marvel for tackling the enormity of Nazi evil by subversively using comedy. Lubitsch’s legendary “Touch” is evident throughout the film, especially when one of the troupe’s aspiring Jewish actors distracts the Gestapo, performing Shylock’s famous soliloquy on the universality of human existence: “If you prick us do we not bleed, tickle us do we not laugh, if you poison us do we not die…”

Lubitsch’s master class in comedy-as-resistance and a brilliantly executed bookend to Lombard’s prolific, but all too brief career.
Nothing Sacred
Carole Lombard, Frederic March
Dir. William Wellman
1937
77 mins
Comedy, Romance

Screened on Mar 6 2010

Another blistering and cynical comedy from screenwriter and former newspaperman Ben Hecht. Nothing Sacred follows small-town girl Lombard, who may or may not be dying of radium poisoning, as she’s catapulted to media stardom (and receives an immense amount of public sympathy) thanks to the melodramatic reportage of sensationalist New York newspaperman Fredric March. A film full of comeuppances, irrational romance and characteristic screwball dialog, audiences today will find Nothing Sacred’s observations about the media and the public’s fascination with the melodramatic, disconcertingly sharp.
My Man Godfrey
Carole Lombard, William Powell
Dir. Gregory La Cava
1936
94 mins
Comedy, Romance

Screened on Feb 6 2010

In this Depression Era comedy, Carole Lombard plays the happy-go-lucky daughter of a wealthy New York family, who picks up the homeless “forgotten man” William Powell during a high-society scavenger hunt (apparently collecting human beings is more fun than objects). After Powell dresses down the party-goers for their inconsideration for the inhabitants of Manhattan’s lower depths, Lombard feels ashamed and hires him as her family’s butler. While Lombard takes on the task of “rehabilitating” Powell, the pair quickly challenge each others’ tightly held beliefs about their respective stations in life, and of course, fall in love. One of the great comedies of the 1930s, My Man Godfrey gave audiences a send-up of the idle rich, a parable about judging "books by their covers", and succeeds thanks to the chemistry and timing of Lombard and Powell.

Twentieth Century
Carole Lombard, John Barrymore
Dir. Howard Hawks
1934
91 mins
Comedy, Romance

Screened on Jan 2 2010

1934 was a year that saw the emergence of a new kind of movie – the screwball comedy – whose hallmark was the unpredictable and often volatile chemistry of its romantic leads. The great american director Howard Hawks had seen something of this nature in the young actress Carole Lombard - and challenged her to show her real mettle on screen.

John Barrymore plays a svengali-like broadway director who molds and crafts Lombard into a theatrical sensation. They become lovers, have wonderful fights and after their eventual split, she goes on to Hollywood and stardom as his stage success falters. Years later, they meet aboard a train – the Twentieth Century Limited – and Barrymore tries to woo Lombard back (and resurrect his career) amidst dialog and emotions that hurdle headlong down the tracks as fast as a locomotive.

Ben Hecht’s script and Hawks’ direction were an early run at the over-lapping dialog and swift delivery that would become a hallmark of the “screwball” genre and Hawks’ comedy films, with Twentieth Century launching Lombard on her path to becoming the highest paid actress in Hollywood by the end of the 1930s.


Touch of Evil
Charlton Heston, Janet Leigh, Orson Welles
Dir. Orson Welles
1958
112 mins
Drama, Action

Screened on Dec 5 2009

Touch of Evil<1/> is Welles' baroque border drama which, along with Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, is often cited as the terminus of Hollywood's "film noir" cycle. Appropriately, the picture has more than a little darkness in it. The film straddles a lazy stretch of western border, with Welles playing a rotund and corrupt police captain increasingly at odds with a Mexican narco-cop – played by Charlton Heston! During a joint investigation into a car bombing at the local border crossing, Heston becomes progressively suspicious (and in danger of becoming a victim) of Welles’ nefarious methods. Janet Leigh plays Heston's wife, who winds up kidnapped and held in a desolate motel (eerily previewing her stay at the Bates Motel in Hitchcock's Psycho, two years later). To add to the dark carnival, Marlene Dietrich plays Welles’ old flame and owner of a Mexican bawdy house and Mercedes McCambridge is a menacing leather-clad gang leader…what more could you ask for?

Now considered an important work of the cinema, Touch of Evil was, like most of Welles' previous films, heavily edited by the studio, and the film was released in the "B" slot of a double bill. In 1998, Universal premiered a new "restored" version of the film edited by Walter Murch (who was guided by a forty-year-old memo Welles had written to Universal describing scene-by-scene what he thought should be done to the make the film acceptable). Not quite the director's cut, but far preferable to the original release version, we'll present the 1998 restoration as we conclude our discussion of one of the cinema's most independent and original filmmakers.

The Lady From Shanghai
Orson Welles, Rita Hayworth
Dir. Orson Welles
1946
87 mins
Thriller, Drama

Screened on Nov 7 2009

Throughout his life, Orson Welles had trouble with money. Despite periods of great success in his early career, Welles’ ambitions always outpaced his resources, leaving him stretched thin while supporting his elaborate radio, theatre and film projects (as well as his personal appetites). In 1946, Welles was again short on funds - this time to finish his stage production of Around The World in Eighty Days – and turned to Columbia Pictures with a deal. Columbia would front him some quick cash for his stage work and in return, Welles would write, direct, produce and star in a film for free. And such is the creation story of The Lady From Shanghai. Made quickly in late 1946 and early 1947, the studio would delay release of the film for more than a year as it trimmed Welles’ film to a manageable length (a recurring pattern in Welles’ life).

The Lady from Shanghai was based on the pulp novel If I Die Before I Wake by Sherwood King and in Welles’ hands, became a twisting tale of insurance scams, adultery, frame-ups and murder. The director cast his then-wife Rita Hayworth in the title role and created one of the cinema’s iconic femme fatales (notoriously cutting Hayworth’s trademark long red hair and dyeing what remained blond). The film’s famous finale in an amusement park house of mirrors is a perfectly refracted analog to the film’s convoluted plot, and Welles’ own fragmenting artistic approach as a film magician.
Jane Eyre
Joan Fontaine, Orson Welles, Maragaret O'Brien
Dir. Robert Stevenson
1944
97 mins
Romance, Drama

Screened on Oct 3 2009

In 1939, Orson Welles was a golden boy, but by 1944, Hollywood's reverse
alchemy had turned him to lead. After RKO broke Welles' contract after the
commercial failure of his second film, The Magnificent Ambersons, 20th
Century-Fox hoped to remake him as a leading man (he was still in his 20s,
after all).

Based on the popular 19th century novel by Charlotte Bronte, Joan Fontaine
plays the orphan Jane who suffers abuse and privations during a difficult
upbringing and finally falls for her moody, and older, employer Edward
Rochester (played by Welles). The film's setting in a large manor house
surrounded by fog-bound moors, lends an appropriate gothic air - there's
more than skeletons in Rochester's attic. Welles would continue throughout
his career to act in films that he neither wrote, directed or produced -
often as a way to raise money for his increasingly independent productions.

Despite Orson Welles' position as "just an actor", Jane Eyre still reflected
some of Welles' creative influence - if only tangentially. The production
was based on Welles' own radio adaptation of the Bronte novel and was
assisted by a few of his familiars: friend and screenwriter John Houseman,
supporting actress Agnes Moorehead and composer Bernard Herrmann. Of the
many filmed versions of Jane Eyre, this production remains among the best
and most atmospheric.
Citizen Kane
Orson Welles, Joseph Cotton, Dorothy Comingore
Dir. Orson Welles
1941
119 mins
Drama, Historical

Screened on Sep 5 2009

For a brief moment in the late 1930s, Orson Welles was a golden boy. A
closely-followed writer, producer, actor and director of the New York stage,
as well as one of the most recognizable voices on national radio, Welles'
abilities seemed boundless. Following the great disturbance of 1938 - his
infamous War of the Worlds radio program - RKO finally lured Welles to
Hollywood in 1939 and gave him complete artistic control and one of the most
astounding contracts ever written to make movies. Two years later he
premiered his staggering achievement, made enemies in powerful places and
began his decades long nomadic journey to become America's most famous
independent filmmaker.

Citizen Kane continues to hold down the top slot on perennial
greatest-films-of-all-times lists and introduced the enigmatic "rosebud" to
our lexicon. Welles co-wrote, directed and starred in this tale of one
man's unbounded appetite, ambition and excess (something he knew more than a
little about), taking a not so veiled swipe at billionaire-publisher William
Randolph Hearst. Citizen Kane and Welles would bear the wrath of Hearst for
many years and he would never again have the popular attention and
extraordinary resources that he found at the ripe age of 25. As Welles
would later say, "I began at the top and worked my way down..." - not quite.
Night and the City
Richard Widmark, Gene Tierney
Dir. Jules Dassin
1950
101 mins
Crime, Thriller

Screened on Jul 3 2009

Night and the City could have been called “The Running Man.” From the first long shot of an empty London square at dusk, to its finale, at dawn, on the Thames, Richard Widmark is always running (either with his mouth, mind or legs). And so was the film’s maker, the under-rated Jules Dassin. Hastily sent to London to avoid being subpoenaed by the House Committee on Un-American Activities, Dassin later revealed he never had time to read the crime novel his film is based on.

From the gritty realistic night scenes of London’s back alleys and public squares (including still un-repaired war damage), to the dim interiors of its nightclubs and wrestling arenas, the folds of the great city’s underbelly are probed by Dassin and the high-contrast, black and white photography of Max Greene. It may be a shadowy London, replete with professional beggars, prostitutes, black marketers and mobsters, but it’s an American swindler played by Widmark that’s the engine of the film. He’s a hustler and (unacknowledged by him) small-fish-in-a-big-pond, about to be swallowed whole by the crumbling, dark city.

Under-seen for years, Night and the City is an extraordinary film and an important entry in the film noir canon. With Gene Tierney.
Out of the Past
Robert Mitchum, Jane Greer, Kirk Douglas
Dir. Jacques Tourneur
1947
97 mins
Drama, Thriller

Screened on Jun 6 2009

Robert Mitchum is a man with a past, hired to track down Kirk Douglas’ double-crossing girlfriend, played by Jane Greer.

This could have been a standard take-the-money-and-run film, but director Jacques Tourneur scrambles the motivations, and time itself, producing a seminal work of film noir. Mitchum’s heavy-lidded eyes are a perfect match for the sometimes dreamlike qualities of this film. His projection of indifference slowly gives way to a hope that he might yet be able to escape his past and start anew with Greer. But this is a noir, and fate isn’t so easily cheated. The two aren’t just running from Douglas, but time itself.
Love Me Tonight
Maurice Chevalier, Jeanette MacDonald
Dir. Rouben Mamoulian
1932
104 mins
Musical, Comedy

Screened on May 2 2009

Maurice Courtelin, a Parisian tailor (Maurice Chevalier), is owed a great sum of money by a viscount (Charles Ruggles). Stalling for time, the titled but penniless nobleman moves Maurice into the family chateau and passes him off as a baron. The beguiling Maurice soon charms the entire aristocratic household, except for the haughty Princess Jeanette (Jeanette MacDonald), who remains suspicious of him. But suspicion eventually gives way to love.
A Star Is Born
Judy Garland, James Mason, Jack Carson
Dir. George Cukor
1954
181 mins
Drama, Musical

Screened on Apr 4 2009

Four years after being let go by MGM, Judy Garland was back in pictures with George Cukor’s epic-length musical for Warner Brothers. James Mason is a past-his-prime movie star who discovers Garland and promotes her talent and career. As she steadily rises in fame and fortune, he descends into alcoholism and self-loathing – in real life, the two actors’ trajectories were almost the reverse. Markedly darker in tone and subject matter than most musicals of the era, A Star is Born is heartbreakingly magnificent and was included in the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry in 2000.
On The Town
Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra, Betty Garrett
Dir. Stanley Donen & Gene Kelly
1949
98 mins
Comedy, Musical

Screened on Mar 7 2009

MGM’s specialty musical unit, headed by legendary producer Arthur Freed, struck gold year after year in the ‘40s and ‘50s.

In 1949, the rising star Gene Kelly was signed to not only star in, but direct (along with Stanley Donen), MGM’s latest color extravaganza about a trio of sailors on brief shore leave in New York. The film teamed Kelly with heart-throb Frank Sinatra, the leggy Ann Miller and the ace writing team of Adolph Green and Betty Comden. Based loosely on a Broadway hit from 1944, the film version retains some of Leonard Bernstein’s original stage music, but added many new songs by Roger Edens. Look for some great location shooting in New York City and enjoy a Technicolor night out – and on the town.
Swing Time
Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers
Dir. George Stevens
1936
120 mins
Comedy, Musical

Screened on Feb 7 2009

With this 1936 RKO production, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers would hit their artistic and box-office peak.

After standing up his fiancé at the alter, Astaire hopes to win her back by making something of himself in New York. The only problem is, he quickly falls for dance instructor Rogers and the two make beautiful music (and dance) together. The film features some of Astaire/Rogers’ best performances to songs including Pick Yourself Up, The Way You Look Tonight, A Fine Romance and Never Gonna Dance. Swing Time was included in the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry in 2004 and is a lasting testament to this singular dance partnership.
Gold Diggers of 1935
Dick Powell, Adolphe Menjou, Gloria Stuart
Dir. Busby Berkeley
1935
98 mins
Comedy, Musical

Screened on Jan 3 2009

Warner’s finally saw fit to give Busby Berkeley full directing control over the third of five “Gold Diggers” films - but this was no freshman outing for the former Army parade director. Berkeley had already mined plenty of gold for Warner’s, acting as architect of some of the biggest dance constructions put to film (42nd Street, Footlight Parade and Gold Diggers of 1933). In this outing, he would further develop his interest in vast geometric compositions, telescoping scale and a surrealist’s eye for dislocation. But Berkeley also revealed a cynic’s understanding of the realities of the Depression-era.

Gold Diggers trips along so effortlessly that one might miss the human compromises amidst the opulence and inconsequence of an upstate resort and its self-absorbed guests. Dick Powell’s a hotel manager working his way through medical school and Gloria Stewart is the cloistered daughter of a miserly heiress; Adolph Menjou is a delirious Barrymore-esque Russian director hired to stage a benefit show for the “Milk Fund”; and the film’s enormous set pieces were Berkeley’s own private Work Projects Administration, employing hundreds of showgirls, craftsmen, actors and set constructors.
The Fugitive
Henry Fonda, Dolores del Rio
Dir. John Ford
1947
104 mins
Drama, Thriller

Screened on Dec 6 2008

Henry Fonda plays a wandering Latin American priest who travels the back roads of an anonymous country, escaping religious persecution. Ford regular Ward Bond is an American on the lam, himself a fugitive, who assists Fonda in hiding and escaping the authorities. Following World War II, Ford increasingly retreated to western location films in order to escape the demands, expectations and politicking of Hollywood. The Fugitive took Ford and Fonda south of the border and into a rare collaboration with prominent Mexican artists, both in front of and behind the camera. Mexican stars Delores Del Rio and Pedro Armendariz share the screen with Fonda and Bond, Emilio Fernandez co-produces and the great Gabriel Figueroa supplies the extraordinary photography. Based loosely on the Graham Greene novel, The Power and The Glory, The Fugitive exposes some of John Ford’s most personal beliefs and was the closest he came in his later period to making a self-conscious “art film”. Audiences and critics would punish him for it.
They Were Expendable
Robert Montgomery, John Wayne, Donna Reed
Dir. John Ford
1945
135 mins
Drama, War

Screened on Nov 1 2008

Released on December 20th, 1945, They Were Expendable was John Ford’s Christmas gift to a war-weary and recovering America. The film stars Robert Montgomery and John Wayne as a pair of PT Boat commanders, stationed in the Philippines and in love with the same nurse (Donna Reed). Romantic sparing is kept to a minimum however, as their obvious affection is for the crews of their high-powered torpedo boats (the boats themselves are stars of this film) as they face an ever-encroaching Japanese invasion force. What makes the film so potent is Ford’s almost documentary approach to much of the action-sequences, and the film’s conclusion at arguably one of the lowest points of the American campaign in the Pacific. A tribute to those who fought, the film gracefully acknowledges that the audience knows how the story ends.

John Ford often created mythic films about some of this country’s historically significant moments, but with They Were Expendable, the great director tackled memorializing the monumental struggle just concluded (and still raw), and They Were Expendable gave Ford the opportunity to create a mythic film, ahead of the history books.
Young Mr. Lincoln
Henry Fonda, Alice Brady
Dir. John Ford
1939
100 mins
Drama, Historical

Screened on Oct 4 2008

A nice bookend to last month’s rarity The Prisoner of Shark Island (about the trial and imprisonment of Dr. Samuel Mudd, who aided an injured John Wilkes Booth just after the assignation of Abraham Lincoln). This month’s film, Young Mr. Lincoln, backs up a few decades and takes a close look at the life and times of a young lawyer from Illinois – Henry Fonda plays Abraham Lincoln. The film is also a nice primer (and reminder) on how our political leaders used to be honed for public service.
The Prisoner of Shark Island
Warner Baxter, Gloria Stuart
Dir. John Ford
1936
96 mins
Drama, Historical

Screened on Sep 6 2008

A few short hours after President Lincoln has been assassinated, Dr. Samuel Mudd gives medical treatment to a wounded man who shows up at his door. Mudd has no idea that the president is dead and that he is treating his murderer, John Wilkes Booth. But that doesn't save him when the army posse searching for Booth finds evidence that Booth has been to the doctor's house. Dr. Mudd is arrested for complicity and sentenced to life imprisonment, to be served in the infamous pestilence-ridden Dry Tortugas.
The Thief of Bagdad
Conrad Veidt, Sabu, June Duprez
Dir. Ludwig Berger, Michael Powell
1940
106 mins
Fantasy, Family

Screened on Aug 2 2008

With familiar elements from the famous omnibus 1001 Arabian Nights, The Thief of Bagdad’s pioneering special effects and Technicolor extravaganza make this film essential viewing. When Prince Ahmad is blinded, imprisoned and cast out of Bagdad (yes that’s how the film spells it, and yes, Iraq) by his evil adviser Jaffar, Ahmad joins forces with the scrappy thief Abu in a scheme to win back his royal position and the heart of a beautiful princess. Along the way Ahmad stumbles upon a very special bottle, and a Genie…

Producer Alexander Korda spared no expense to bring this tale to the big screen, and along the way he employed multiple directors, including Michael Powell (who would develop into one of Britain’s finest filmmakers). The film was ground-breaking for its time and continues to amaze and delight decades later. If you’ve only seen the relentless Disney/Robin Williams version of this tale, The Thief of Bagdad is essential viewing.
Sleeping Beauty
Mary Costa, Bill Shirley, Eleanor Audley (Voices)
Dir. Clyde Geronimi
1959
75 mins
Family, Animation

Screened on Jul 5 2008

Another classic story re-told by Walt Disney and his famous animators, Sleeping Beauty is a noteworthy classic for a number of reasons (not the least of which was its nearly decade long production schedule).

Based on the famous Brother’s Grimm tale, there’s a beautiful girl, a curse, three fairies, one prince charming and a witch that becomes a dragon. The film boasts music adapted from the Tchaikovsky ballet, sublime special effects work and an incredible widescreen tapestry of background art with a different “look” than other Disney titles.

Sleeping Beauty would be Disney’s first animated film shot in a widescreen format and the studio took the opportunity to cover all of the film’s frames with gorgeous detail evoking medieval art and formalism. If you find yourself distracted from the classic tale of love and treachery because of the amazing background art, you can thank Disney production designer Eyvind Earle (to whom Disney gave uncharacteristic freedom). The result is a storied film as notable for its tale as its execution.
La Belle et la Bête (Beauty and The Beast)
Jean Marais, Josette Day
Dir. Jean Cocteau
1946
96 mins
Fantasy, Romance

Screened on Jun 7 2008

For anyone looking to experience the cinema’s full potential for poetry and lyricism, you would be hard pressed to find a greater example than Jean Cocteau’s 1946 masterpiece – La Belle et la Bete, or Beauty and The Beast.

The story of a magic rose, a beautiful daughter’s sacrifice to save her father and her vow of self-imprisonment on the dark estate of an actual “Beast” is a familiar one. But, to anyone who knows their fairy-tales and the classic Disney film – you’ve never seen this story of love’s triumph as elaborately and beautifully revealed, as in Cocteau’s film. Produced and released in France just after the end of World War II, the film is ripe with metaphoric and psychological nuances. In addition to its hauntingly beautiful sets, costumes, lighting and cinematography, the film also presents one of the greatest of film scores by Georges Auric. Beauty and the Beast is truly one of the self-evident masterpieces of world cinema and perfectly approachable by young and old audiences alike.
The Apartment
Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine, Fred MacMurray
Dir. Billy Wilder
1960
125 mins
Romance, Comedy

Screened on Apr 5 2008

Some Like It Hot
Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon
Dir. Billy Wilder
1959
120 mins
Comedy, Romance

Screened on Mar 1 2008

After witnessing the St. Valentine’s Massacre, two down on their luck musicians, played by Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon, flee from the mob by joining an all-girl band. Seems funny enough - but Wilder and his frequent writing partner, I.A.L. Diamond, mined more than laughs from this simple premise, unleashing gender-bending mayhem, and a bursting-at-the-seams Marilyn Monroe, on audiences in 1959. Lemmon and Curtis dive into their female personas with such abandon they set the high water mark for all man-in-a-dress comedy roles. But the genius of Wilder is that he can’t leave well enough alone, and each scene and entanglement trumps the last as Curtis falls for Monroe (and famously spoofs Cary Grant) and a wigged Lemmon is pursued by a lecherous old man -finally succumbing to his advances with the ingenious summation - “Nobody’s Perfect”. Perhaps not, but Some Like It Hot comes awfully close.
Stalag 17
William Holden, Don Taylor
Dir. Billy Wilder
1953
120 mins
Comedy, Drama

Screened on Feb 2 2008

Double Indemnity
Fred MacMurray, Barbara Stanwyck, Edward G. Robins
Dir. Billy Wilder
1944
107 mins
Crime, Thriller

Screened on Jan 5 2008

One of Billy Wilder's first films as a director in America, Double Indemnity would anchor the start of a long and successful career for the Polish-born writer-turned-director. Wilder was already an accomplished screenwriter in Europe when he emigrated to the US in 1933, and he had steady work in Hollywood into the war years. But it would be the opportunity to combine his writing abilities with a sharp eye for directing that would set Wilder on a path to creating some of the most important and sophisticated films in American cinema. In 1944, however, his American career was still just beginning...

And what a beginning: Based on a novel by pulp luminary James M. Cain, and with Raymond Chandler assisting Wilder on the screenplay, Double Indemnity would go on to seven Academy Award nominations, marking the arrival of a major new talent (threat) in Hollywood. Now considered a central title in the film noir tradition, Wilder's film about an amoral insurance agent who's sucked into an insurance fraud and murder scheme, is among the most uncompromising of the early noirs - with Barbara Stanwyck and Fred McMurray playing unredeemed co-conspirators.
Rio Bravo
John Wayne, Dean Martin, Ricky Nelson
Dir. Howard Hawks
1959
141 mins
Western, Romance

Screened on Dec 1 2007

The term masterpiece often frightens (rather than entices) viewers away from important works of the cinema. In the case of Rio Bravo, Howard Hawks not only created a late masterpiece, but produced a film that gathered together many of the elements of his previous work into one sprawling, and accessible, drama/comedy/action film. The film stars John Wayne, Dean Martin, Ricky Nelson, Angie Dickinson, Walter Brennan, Ward Bond and a host of other familiar faces in what Hawks once called his response to that other sheriff-in-trouble film - High Noon.

That Rio Bravo is a central film in the American Cinema goes without saying, but it’s also one of the most entertaining important films you’ll ever see – a multi-layered, multi-generational, subtle and subversive western. If Hawks is underappreciated outside of cineaste circles, it’s probably because his films are so easy to digest, his mastery always in service of the audience’s enjoyment. But if that’s not enough enticement to watch this great film, I’ll end with this – to the best of my knowledge, Rio Bravo also represents the only instance where John Wayne kisses a man, on-screen!
The Man From Laramie
James Stewart, Arthur Kennedy
Dir. Anthony Mann
1955
104 mins
Mystery, Western

Screened on Nov 3 2007

One of seven westerns directed by Mann to star James Stewart, The Man From Laramie would be the pair’s final film together. Befitting the occasion, the film is among their strongest work, and Mann elaborates a complex drama with his signature elements: obsessive behavior, physical and psychological pain, bursts of unpredictable violence, and the isolation of characters in a larger context (in this case the broad landscape of New Mexico). Like last month’s featured director Andre De Toth, Mann had made his share of film noirs (T-Men, Raw Deal, Side Street), and he infused his westerns with many of the noir themes he explored in his crime films of the ‘40s. In Stewart, the director found an actor loved by movie-goers for his portraits of the courageous every-man, but increasingly confident to explore the darker side of his leading roles (during this same period, Stewart partnered with Alfred Hitchcock in Rear Window, The Man Who Knew Too Much and Vertigo) and together they helped reshape the tone and subject matter of Westerns for many years to come.
Thunder Over The Plains
Randolph Scott, Lex Barker
Dir. André De Toth
1953
82 mins
Romance, War

Screened on Oct 6 2007

Red River
John Wayne, Montgomery Clift
Dir. Howard Hawks, Arthur Rosson
1948
133 mins
Western, Action

Screened on Sep 1 2007

Hawks’ first foray into the western genre (and, uncharacteristically for him, a location-heavy outdoor film) remains one of the finest in the genre. Starring John Wayne as a hard-driving (and sometimes tyrannical) rancher, Red River surveys many of Hawks’ favorite themes – male competitiveness, individualized ethics, professionalism and loyalty under fire. Epic in scope and rousing in its assemblage (with some excellent editing by Academy Award Nominee Christian Nyby), the film is of central importance to any appreciation of the American Cinema and was added to the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry in 1990. Red River also stars Montgomery Clift (in his first film role), Joanne Dru and a host of Hawks and Western notables – Walter Brennan, Harry Carey (Sr. and Jr.), John Ireland and Noah Beery, Jr.
The Nutty Professor
Jerry Lewis, Stella Stevens
Dir. Jerry Lewis
1963
107 mins
Comedy, Sci-Fi

Screened on Aug 4 2007

Who Done It?
Bud Abbott, Lou Costello
Dir. Erle C. Kenton
1942
77 mins
Comedy, Mystery

Screened on Jul 7 2007

Duck Soup
Marx Brothers
Dir. Leo McCarey
1933
68 mins
Comedy, Musical

Screened on Jun 2 2007

Groucho, Chico, Harpo and Zeppo are slippery as ever in this fast-paced political farce that lampoons fascism with enough screen anarchy to fill several comedies. Duck Soup was the last and best film the Brothers made at Paramount Studios and its box-office failure, in hindsight, reveals a film far ahead of its time and audience. Along with the Brothers’ 1935 MGM film, A Night At The Opera, Duck Soup marks the high point of their particular brand of comedy subversion. Almost 75 years later, it is hard to resist. We were especially pleased to be present Duck Soup from a fine 16mm print and began our program with the rarely seen 1963 Oscar-winning animated short, The Critic.
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes
Jane Russell, Marilyn Monroe
Dir. Howard Hawks
1953
91 mins
Comedy, Musical

Screened on Apr 7 2007

The Band Wagon
Fred Astaire, Cyd Charisse
Dir. Vincente Minnelli
1953
111 mins
Comedy, Musical

Screened on Mar 3 2007

Meet Me in St. Louis
Judy Garland, Margaret O'Brien
Dir. Vincente Minnelli
1944
113 mins
Family, Musical

Screened on Feb 3 2007

The director Vincente Minnelli, and MGM’s legendary musical film producer Arthur Freed, had a long-lasting and fruitful partnership, creating some of the most memorable musicals in film history. With their 1944 film, they took a thoughtful backwards glance to a simpler time, and war-time audiences were treated to the full MGM treatment - in Technicolor. Meet Me in St. Louis stars Judy Garland (the future Mrs. Minnelli) and a cast of memorable character actors in a nostalgic look at the life of an upper-middle class family in turn of the century St. Louis. While the film is marvelously entertaining period piece, it also represented an important evolution in the art of the big-screen musical – it had a plot!
Top Hat
Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers
Dir. Mark Sandrich
1935
101 mins
Comedy, Musical

Screened on Jan 6 2007

Invasion Of The Body Snatchers
Donald Sutherland, Brooke Adams, Jeff Goldblum
Dir. Philip Kaufman
1978
115 mins
Horror, Sci-Fi

Screened on Dec 2 2006

I Walked With A Zombie
James Ellison, Frances Dee
Dir. Jacques Tourneur
1943
69 mins
Horror, Thriller

Screened on Nov 4 2006

Cat People
Simone Simon, Kent Smith
Dir. Jacques Tourneur
1942
73 mins
Horror, Thriller

Screened on Oct 7 2006

Island of Lost Souls
Charles Laughton, Richard Arlen
Dir. Erle C. Kenton
1932
70 mins
Horror, Sci-Fi

Screened on Sep 2 2006

Vertigo
James Stewart, Kim Novak
Dir. Alfred Hitchcock
1958
128 mins
Crime, Thriller

Screened on Aug 5 2006

The Man Who Knew Too Much
James Stewart, Doris Day
Dir. Alfred Hitchcock
1956
120 mins
Adventure, Mystery

Screened on Jul 1 2006

Rear Window
James Stewart, Grace Kelly
Dir. Alfred Hitchcock
1954
112 mins
Crime, Thriller

Screened on Jun 3 2006

The Killers
Burt Lancaster, Ava Gardner, Edmond O'Brien
Dir. Robert Siodmak
1946
103 mins
Crime, Mystery

Screened on Apr 1 2006

The Big Sleep
Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall
Dir. Howard Hawks
1946
144 mins
Crime, Thriller

Screened on Mar 4 2006

Murder, My Sweet
Dick Powell, Claire Trevor
Dir. Edward Dmytryk
1944
95 mins
Crime, Thriller

Screened on Feb 4 2006

Laura
Gene Tierney, Dana Andrews
Dir. Otto Preminger
1944
88 mins
Crime, Mystery

Screened on Jan 7 2006

The Lady Eve
Barbara Stanwyck, Henry Fonda
Dir. Preston Sturges
1941
94 mins
Comedy, Romance

Screened on Dec 3 2005

Bringing Up Baby
Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant
Dir. Howard Hawks
1938
102 mins
Comedy, Romance

Screened on Nov 5 2005

The Thin Man
William Powell, Myrna Loy
Dir. W.S. Van Dyke
1934
91 mins
Comedy, Crime

Screened on Oct 1 2005

Twentieth Century
John Barrymore, Carole Lombard
Dir. Howard Hawks
1934
91 mins
Comedy, Romance

Screened on Sep 3 2005

Fort Apache
John Wayne, Henry Fonda, Shirley Temple
Dir. John Ford
1948
125 mins
Western, Adventure

Screened on Aug 6 2005

Gunga-Din
Cary Grant, Victor McLaglen, Douglas Fairbanks Jr.
Dir. George Stevens
1939
117 mins
Action, Adventure

Screened on Jul 2 2005

The Adventures Of Robin Hood
Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Claude Rains
Dir. Michael Curtiz, William Keighley
1938
102 mins
Action, Adventure

Screened on Jun 4 2005

Sweet Smell of Success
Burt Lancaster, Tony Curtis
Dir. Alexander Mackendrick
1957
96 mins
Drama, Drama

Screened on Apr 2 2005

The Bad and the Beautiful
Lana Turner, Kirk Douglas
Dir. Vincente Minnelli
1952
118 mins
Drama, Romance

Screened on Mar 5 2005

In a Lonely Place
Humphrey Bogart, Gloria Grahame
Dir. Nicholas Ray
1950
94 mins
Drama, Mystery

Screened on Feb 5 2005

The Hollywood Ten
Alvah Bessie, Herbert J. Biberman
Dir. John Berry
1950
15 mins
Documentary, Historical

Screened on Feb 5 2005

Sullivan’s Travels
Joel McCrea, Veronica Lake
Dir. Preston Sturges
1941
90 mins
Adventure, Comedy

Screened on Jan 1 2005

West Side Story
Natalie Wood, Richard Beymer, Russ Tamblyn
Dir. Jerome Robbins, Robert Wise
1961
152 mins
Musical, Romance

Screened on Dec 4 2004

Singin’ In The Rain
Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor, Debbie Reynolds
Dir. Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly
1952
103 mins
Comedy, Musical

Screened on Nov 6 2004

42nd Street
Warner Baxter, Bebe Daniels
Dir. Lloyd Bacon
1933
89 mins
Musical, Romance

Screened on Oct 2 2004

Love Me Tonight
Maurice Chevalier, Jeanette MacDonald
Dir. Rouben Mamoulian
1932
120 mins
Musical, Comedy

Screened on Sep 4 2004

The African Queen
Humphrey Bogart, Katharine Hepburn
Dir. John Huston
1951
105 mins
Adventure, Romance

Screened on Aug 7 2004

Treasure of the Sierra Madre
Humphrey Bogart, Walter Huston, Tim Holt
Dir. John Huston
1948
126 mins
Adventure, Drama

Screened on Jul 3 2004

To Have and Have Not
Humphrey Bogart, Walter Brennan, Lauren Bacall
Dir. Howard Hawks
1944
100 mins
Adventure, Thriller

Screened on Jun 5 2004

Rebel Without A Cause
James Dean, Natalie Wood
Dir. Nicholas Ray
1955
111 mins
Drama, Romance

Screened on May 1 2004

East of Eden
Julie Harris, James Dean
Dir. Elia Kazan
1955
115 mins
Drama, Drama

Screened on Apr 3 2004

On The Waterfront
Marlon Brando, Karl Malden, Rod Steiger
Dir. Elia Kazan
1954
108 mins
Crime, Romance

Screened on Mar 6 2004

All About Eve
Bette Davis, Anne Baxter
Dir. Joseph L. Mankiewicz
1950
138 mins
Drama, Drama

Screened on Feb 7 2004

Mildred Pierce
Joan Crawford, Jack Carson
Dir. Michael Curtiz
1945
111 mins
Mystery, Romance

Screened on Jan 3 2004

The Philadelphia Story
Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn, James Stewart
Dir. George Cukor
1940
112 mins
Comedy, Romance

Screened on Dec 6 2003

2001: A Space Odyssey
Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood, William Sylvester
Dir. Stanley Kubrick
1968
141 mins
Sci-Fi, Adventure

Screened on Nov 1 2003

Dr. Strangelove
Peter Sellers, George C. Scott
Dir. Stanley Kubrick
1964
93 mins
Comedy, War

Screened on Oct 4 2003

The Day the Earth Stood Still
Michael Rennie, Patricia Neal
Dir. Robert Wise
1951
92 mins
Sci-Fi, Drama

Screened on Sep 6 2003

North by Northwest
Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint
Dir. Alfred Hitchcock
1959
131 mins
Adventure, Thriller

Screened on Aug 2 2003

To Catch a Thief
Cary Grant, Grace Kelly
Dir. Alfred Hitchcock
1955
106 mins
Crime, Thriller

Screened on Jul 5 2003

Notorious
Cary Grant, Ingrid Bergman, Claude Rains
Dir. Alfred Hitchcock
1946
101 mins
Romance, Thriller

Screened on Jun 7 2003

Sunset Boulevard
William Holden, Gloria Swanson
Dir. Billy Wilder
1950
110 mins
Drama, Comedy

Screened on May 2 2003

The Night of the Hunter
Robert Mitchum, Shelley Winters, Lillian Gish
Dir. Charles Laughton
1955
93 mins
Drama, Thriller

Screened on Apr 4 2003

The Third Man
Joseph Cotten, Orson Welles
Dir. Carol Reed
1949
104 mins
Mystery, Thriller

Screened on Mar 7 2003

Maltese Falcon
Humphrey Bogart, Peter Lorre
Dir. John Huston
1941
101 mins
Crime, Mystery

Screened on Feb 7 2003

His Girl Friday
Cary Grant, Rosalind Russell
Dir. Howard Hawks
1940
92 mins
Comedy, Romance

Screened on Jan 3 2003

It Happened One Night
Clark Gable, Claudette Colbert
Dir. Frank Capra
1934
105 mins
Comedy, Romance

Screened on Dec 6 2002

Forbidden Planet
Walter Pidgeon, Anne Francis, Leslie Nielsen
Dir. Fred M. Wilcox
1956
98 mins
Sci-Fi, Thriller

Screened on Nov 1 2002

The Searchers
John Wayne, Natalie Wood, Vera Miles
Dir. John Ford
1956
119 mins
Adventure, Western

Screened on Oct 4 2002

Stagecoach
Claire Trevor, John Wayne
Dir. John Ford
1939
96 mins
Action, Western

Screened on Sep 6 2002

Only Angels Have Wings
Cary Grant, Rita Hayworth
Dir. Howard Hawks
1939
121 mins
Drama, Adventure

Screened on Aug 2 2002

Casablanca
Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman
Dir. Michael Curtiz
1942
102 mins
Drama, Romance

Screened on Jul 5 2002

Lost Horizon
Ronald Colman, Jane Wyatt
Dir. Frank Capra
1937
118 mins
Adventure, Drama

Screened on Jun 7 2002

Citizen Kane
Joseph Cotten, Orson Welles
Dir. Orson Welles
1941
119 mins
Drama, Mystery

Screened on May 2 2002